School Strengths

Ofsted Report 2015:

  • Leaders, governors and the proprietor are determined guardians of the school’s welcoming culture, maintaining Islamic values while preparing students to take their place in modern British society.

  • Teaching and outcomes are improving quickly, notably in science and mathematics.

  • Leaders do all they can to protect students from extremism and radicalisation. Students understand how to keep themselves safe from risk.

  • The headteacher and deputy headteacher have made a considerable impact on students’ personal development and welfare in a very short time. Students feel safe and are safe in the school.

  • Students behave well at all times. Their conduct is characterised by a deep sense of tolerance and dutiful compassion towards others. Consequently, students’ behaviour is good.

  • Leaders have ensured that all the independent school standards are met.

  • School leaders have ensured that the independent school standards are met. The headteacher and deputy headteacher are committed role models for the students and carry out their duties with intelligence and devotion. They have ably demonstrated their capacity to improve the school through their impact on students’ personal development and welfare. British values are actively promoted with diligence and determination. These are healthy relationships with the local Prevent team and school leaders make sure they follow up on students’ concerns promptly and sensitively.

  • Spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is a strength of the school. Parents spoken to during the inspection pointed to improvements made by the current school leaders. Nearly all expressed complete confidence in the vision for the school and its promotion of Islamic and British values. One parent who contributed to Parent View said, ‘I am happy that the school pays so much attention to character building and practises and preaches tolerance, respect for all and understanding within society.’

  • The headteacher and deputy headteacher have wisely guided students, including those who may be at risk of forming overly strict views, to look into their own hearts and examine their faith to find the right path. Students learn about other faiths and cultures, democracy and British law. They talk maturely about the virtues of tolerance and respect for all. They know that these virtues match the principles of Islam and are also echoed in other belief systems in modern British. Spiritual, culture and moral values are threaded through all subjects. This helps teachers and students to relate their faith to what they are learning about the world and themselves.

  • Students study a balanced range of subjects, including English, Mathematics, Science, Art, Technology, Citizenship, Islamic Studies and Physical Education. They are therefore equipped well for the next stage in their education. They also learn Arabic and Urdu, and study the Qur’an. A wide range of trips and visits ensures that students have the chance to encounter different experiences and people. Students also participate in project work and plan group presentations in order to encourage their enterprise and creative skills.

  • A comprehensive programme of careers education and guidance ensures that students are well prepared for their next steps. Nearly all have ambitious plans for their futures and are looking forward to successful careers. During the inspection, a member of the Prevent team delivered a presentation about careers in the police force. Some students had not considered this as a career choice open to them. In this way, the school broadens students’ horizons.

  • The headteacher has not shirked from tackling inadequate teaching and is crystal clear about what needs to be done to improve the school. School leaders have forged helpful links with neighbouring schools, including maintained secondary schools, in order to observe good practice, which they plan to share with teaching staff.

  • The governance of the school

  • The proprietor and governors are committed guardians of the values of the school, including its promotion of British values. They know exactly how much the school has improved over the last two years and how much it still needs to improve.

  • Governors ensure that teachers’ pay progression is based on the quality of their work and take decisive action when teaching does not meet requirements. Governors are ambitious for the school and are rightly confident in the recent appointment of the current headteacher and deputy headteacher.

  • The arrangements for safeguarding are effective. Meticulous attention is paid to all aspects of students’ safety and physical well-being. Safeguarding procedures and practices meet all requirements.

  • School leaders have ensured that the relevant independent school standards are met. Recent improvements to teaching are beginning to have an impact on students’ progress. For example, books are marked regularly; students appreciate the overall feedback they receive and know what to do to improve.

  • Teaching in science is emerging as a strength in the school. A winning combination of theory, practical work and discussion about science in the outside world has captured students’ interest and stimulated them to work harder and consider careers in science.

  • Topics for study and sequences of lessons are usually well planned with interesting and inspiring resources.

  • School leaders have a direct overview of exactly how much progress each student is making in each subject. This has enabled them to make crucial decisions about which students need more support and intervention to help them to catch up, particularly in Year 11, when students are taking public examinations.

  • Students are diligent and willing to learn. They take pride in their work; their books are neatly kept and are useful for revision.

  • Teachers expect students to continue their studies at home. Homework is set regularly and students complete this with strong sense of motivation. Parents are also able to track progress of their children through a well-designed and easily accessible virtual learning environment.

  • The school’s work to promote students’ personal development and welfare is good.

  • Leaders have ensured that all the independent standards relating to welfare, health and safety are met. They have also ensured that the school adheres to recent guidance regarding the school’s active promotion of British values.

  • Students demonstrate impressive awareness of the world around them and are successfully encouraged to focus on decisions, character and duties. For example, during an assembly, students spoke with dedication about making healthy and safe choices within relationships and how such choices build character. A powerful key message of their assembly was ‘character is destiny’.

  • School leaders have ensured that students help to share the purpose and vision of the school. They were invited to contribute their own vision statements about what they wanted for the school and their own future. These included their wish to contribute to British society, gaining confidence and ‘looking for a better future for Muslim women’.

  • Students are kept safe from the risks of extremism and radicalisation. Students understand that they may be vulnerable and are able to talk openly about any concerns with school leaders. Students speak knowledgeably about what they have learned from the regular presentations from the Prevent team in Slough.

  • Other potential risks to students’ safety and physical well-being are discussed openly and maturely, such as female genital mutilation, sexual exploitation and forced marriage. Students have also learned about principles of equality, democracy and English law.

  • Students make the most of opportunities to attend clubs and activities after school, including arts and crafts club and karate classes. They demonstrate their commitment to helping others, including a vast array of fund-raising work for a range of charities both in Britain and abroad.

  • The behaviour of students is good.

  • Leaders have ensured that an effective system is in place to manage behaviour and promote good conduct. The independent school standards are met.

  • Students are polite and take a friendly and curious interest in visitors. They conduct themselves with modest dignity and are proud of the school and its values.

  • Reminders about cleanliness and tidiness displayed around the school are nearly superfluous because students take excellent care of the environment. Students dress appropriately according to the school code. Nearly all bring the right equipment and understand that they have a duty to contribute to lessons and participate actively in school life.

  • Students have a well-developed understanding of bullying, including how homophobic bullying and derogatory language contradicts British and Islamic values and damaged self-esteem.

  • Students attend school regularly and are punctual. Their attendance rates compare favourably with those found in mainstream schools. School leaders have established highly effective and strict systems for tackling any signs of poor attendance promptly, including the facility to fine parents for unauthorised absences. As a result, no students are persistently absent.

  • The progress of students currently in Year 10 and 11 is beginning to accelerate. Teachers have raised their expectations and are aiming high. They are ensuring that students are focused on catching up and being prepared for their GCSE examinations.

  • Under the leadership of the current headteacher increased expectations and ambition are beginning to lead to higher standards.

  • Students’ progress and outcomes in science are stronger, reflecting the higher-quality teaching students receive. Students also achieve well and in line with age-related expectations in history.

  • Leaders are rightly focusing on those students with impending GCSE examinations. As a result of a similar programme last year and recent improvements to teaching, all school leavers succeeded in gaining GCSE grades in line with the school’s expectations. All took up places to study higher-level courses in sixth forms or further education colleges.

  • Students read widely and with enjoyment. Students told inspectors about how much they had appreciated books studied in class. They also enjoy their private reading of books from the modern and classic British literary heritage. Students regularly visit the public library, which is helping to broaden their reading diet. 

Teacher view:

  • There is a good mixture of Islamic education as well as British Values so that students acquire a firm foundation for further education. 

  • At Madni pupils are encouraged to develop social moral spiritual culture values, which will enable them to become confident team builders and aspiring leaders in the future. 

  • Students are also taught to be active citizens of Britain and have taken part in many charity events, which help those who are at a disadvantage. This has allowed pupils to think deeply of what they have and to be grateful for it 

  • An Islamic environment, where students have the opportunity to build their character following the Sunnah of the Prophet (saw).

  • Encourages healthy eating

  • Bullying free zone

  • Promotes British values

  • Student’s opinions are heard and valued. 

Student View:

  • Our school is always willing to make changes and improvements for the betterment of the students by listening to everyone.

  • Teachers ensure students feel safe and confident in their environment.

  • The school teach both Islamic and British values to be a good citizen.

  • You feel safe talking to teachers about personal issues.

  • Good tarbiyah values

  • Teachers are kind and have patience towards students

  • Freedom to express our views

  • Help prepare for society

  • Good range of trips

  • Charity events

  • Fun extra- curricular activities